Wednesday May 24 , 2017
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Welcome to KWL Logistics

With well over 100 years of experience in Worldwide Freight Forwarding and Logistics, we offer our customers a solution to handle all of their Import, Export, Crosstrade and Logistical requirements under the one umbrella.

Whether you are moving a pallet of cargo from London to Hong Kong, a shipment of 20’ and 40’ containers from New York to Manchester, or you need us to project manage the movement of a machine from Birmingham to Australia, then we can help.

If you value your business then let our team of professionals look after you.

We are just a phone call or email away.


 

Industry News from BIFA

  • Businesses Preparing to Sever Supply Chain Ties Between the UK and the EU to Avoid Brexit Tariffs
    • 32% of UK businesses who use EU suppliers are looking for British replacements
    • Nearly half (46%) of European businesses expect to reduce their use of UK suppliers
    • 36% of UK businesses plan to respond to Brexit by beating down supplier prices
    • The UK’s “weak negotiating position” is seen as the biggest hurdle in trade talks

    With exit negotiations in their early stages, the most pressing supply chain challenge for UK businesses thus far has been currency fluctuation. Almost two thirds (65%) of UK businesses have seen their supply chains become more expensive as a result of the weaker Pound, with nearly a third (29%) re-negotiating some contracts as a result.

     How are UK supply chain mangers preparing for Brexit?
      Already   mapping the potential costs of new tariffs 28%
      Strengthening   our relationship with existing European suppliers 23%
      Performing   a risk analysis exercise 44%
      Looking   for alternative suppliers outside of the EU 21%
      Looking   for alternative suppliers inside the UK 32%
      Pre-emptively   increasing costs 12%
      We have not done any work to prepare 23%

    Gerry Walsh, Group CEO, CIPS, commented:

    “Diplomats either side of the table have barely decided on their negotiating principles and already supply chain managers are deep into their preparations for Brexit. Both European and British businesses will be ready to reroute their supply chains in 2019 if trade negotiations fail and are not wasting time to see what happens.

    “Fluctuations in the exchange rate or the introductions of new tariffs can dramatically change where British companies do business. The separation of the UK from Europe is already well underway even before formal negotiations have begun.”

    In the long-term, European supply chain managers appear more confident about their ability to respond to any tariffs that result from the final negotiated settlement by re-shoring their supply chains within the Single Market. Almost half (46%) of European supply chain managers expect a greater proportion of their supply chain to be removed from  the UK, with just over a quarter (28%) intending to re-shore all or part of their supply chains to Europe.

    While European and British supply chain managers agree that the number one priority for negotiations should be keeping tariffs and quotas to a minimum, the UK supply chain managers responsible for brokering international deals for their organisations believe negotiators face serious hurdles. When asked about the major challenges facing UK negotiators in the trade talks, 39% said the UK has a weak negotiating position and 36% believe there is a lack of time, but 33% believe there is a dearth of supply chain expertise and knowledge in the UK to draw upon. 

    This pessimism is also apparent when it comes to managing the financial costs of Brexit. More than a third (36%) of UK supply chain managers plan to respond by pushing supplier costs lower, while 11% admit that part of their operations may no longer be viable. Worldwide 67% of respondents felt that the uncertainty surrounding international trade agreements were making long-term plans difficult to confirm.

    Gerry Walsh added: 

    “We have already seen high profile disputes between British retailers and their suppliers as a result of currency fluctuations. We now know that this pattern is being replicated across the UK and is likely to escalate.

    “The reshoring of British supply chains in advance of Brexit could provide an excellent opportunity for small businesses looking to win new contracts, but it also comes with significant challenges. Brexit is likely to bring considerable costs for businesses in the UK and Europe; these costs are then going to be passed on to small suppliers and eventually consumers.”

    Source: Chartered Institute of Procurement and Supply

  • BSI’s Global Supply Chain Intelligence report reveals top supply chain risks in 2016

    In 2016 global supply chains continued to face a range of security, social responsibility, and business continuity risks, with many of these issues provoked by one another. BSI noted multiple incidents that started out as a security, social responsibility, or a business continuity risk that cascaded into other supply chain issues. The European migrant crisis is perhaps the best example of a type of event that began as a single security risk, before building into a business continuity disruption as countries imposed border controls, which in turn was exacerbated by blocked migrants looking for work, often falling victim to forced labor in certain nations. As risks, such as the migrant crisis, continue to evolve, it’s imperative that organizations work together to take a holistic risk management approach to ensure they are informed and prepared to address multiple areas of concern.

    BSI’s Global Supply Chain Intelligence Report provides an overview of the top supply chain threats and trends by region to help organizations increase their visibility and understanding of potential exposures within the supply chain. A sample of the highlights by region are identified below:

    Asia

    In 2016, governments in Asia responded to increasing levels of supply chain risks, but many policies were merely reactive and often led to further threats to the integrity or continuity of the supply chain. BSI observed a shift in labor strike threats in China in 2016, driven mainly by concerted government efforts to limit strikes in the country following years of increasing labor disruption. Labor strikes still occurred in large numbers across China last year, but the number of strikes dropped in 2016 for the first time in recent years. Strikes at factories dropped by 31 percent; with two-thirds of provinces – including major apparel, consumer goods, and electronics production hubs – witnessing a decline in manufacturing strikes. An emerging area of concern is the growth in strikes in the logistics sector, including trucking, shipment processing, and delivery, which rose more than fourfold from nine incidents in 2014 to 40 last year.

    Asia also saw an increase in labor rights concerns in Bangladesh in both the readymade garments (RMG) sector and in other industries. A December 2016 survey of the Dhaka slums found a far higher incidence of child labor than previous government studies had suggested, with 15 percent of children employed in formal and informal enterprises. Additionally, the survey found that a significantly larger proportion of children were employed in the formal RMG sector than had been previously believed. The study also documented abusive practices in garment factories that employed children. Over 37 percent of girls reported being forced to work overtime, while children employed in the formal garment sector earned only half the national minimum monthly wage for garment workers.

    Europe

    BSI recorded notable shifts in cargo theft trends and tactics across Germany and Italy in 2016. An increasingly high rate of cargo theft plagued freight shippers in Germany – it’s estimated that nearly half of all cargo truck thefts were incidents in which thieves slashed into the tarpaulins of trailers to steal cargo, a common theft type due to the widespread usage of soft-sided trailers in Europe.

    Europe also experienced significant terrorist attacks in Nice, France in July and Berlin, Germany in December, along with dozens of counterterrorism arrests across Europe in 2016. Those attacks in particular also underscored the threat that terrorists will exploit the supply chain to perpetrate attacks. In both cases, Tunisian men linked to the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS) used cargo trucks to ram into crowds of civilians. The Berlin attacker even perpetrated an explicit disruption of the supply chain before the attack by hijacking a Polish tractor-trailer carrying a shipment of steel beams. ISIS-linked plots involving similar timing and tactics are likely to continue challenging European security into 2017.

    In Turkey, a faction within the military launched a failed coup against the reigning Justice and Development Party (AKP) government on July 15, 2016, leading to significant security and business continuity impacts in the short and long terms. The Turkish government’s response to the coup attempt has exacerbated security and business continuity threats in the country. Days after the coup, the government began widespread purges of numerous government departments and agencies across virtually every ministry, as well as the military, police, and intelligence services. There have been 100,000+ officials removed from public duty, 70,000 investigated and 32,000 arrested in total.

    Americas

    Supply chains in the Americas faced a wide range of risks related to security, corporate social responsibility, and business continuity in 2016. Cargo theft remains a main concern for the Americas with the most dramatic increase in cargo theft rates in Rio de Janeiro last year. Already the second largest hotspot for cargo theft in the country, officials in Rio de Janeiro reported a total of 9,870 cargo theft incidents in 2016, 36 percent more incidents than those recorded in the state in 2015. The year-over-year increase in cargo theft incidents in both Rio de Janeiro and Sao Paulo, combined with minimal efforts to curb the rate of theft, suggests that Brazil could see another year of increased cargo theft in 2017.

    BSI also recorded varying degrees of improvement in corporate social responsibility protections in Latin America in 2016. The BSI SCREEN Intelligence Team reduced the rating for the threat of child labor in both Ecuador and Panama due to each country’s sustained efforts to drastically eliminate the problem. In Ecuador, the government reduced the rate of children working in the country from the 16 percent recorded in 2007 to now less than three percent, with Panama succeeding in reducing the rate of child labor in the country to about four percent, a number that represents a 50 percent reduction since 2012. Although most countries in Latin America improved upon their corporate social responsibility record, some nations, particularly Peru, failed to make much headway last year.

    While the number of supply chain terrorism attacks in 2016 remained nearly level with the previous year in the Americas, the relative targeting of the supply chain increased. The proportion of terrorist attacks involving supply chain targets rose 16 percent compared to terrorism attacks that did not target the supply chain. In addition, supply chain terrorism attacks were more widely distributed than in any previous year, with 38 percent more countries suffering attacks. The top 10 countries for supply chain terrorism incidents accounted for $664 billion worth of global exports, including $96 billion of exports to the United States, highlighting the significant volume of international trade at risk of disruption by terrorist groups.

    In 2017, BSI expects continued threats of cargo theft and drug smuggling in the Americas and Europe, protests over wage and other labor issues across Asia, and persistent risks of terrorism, including terrorist targeting of the supply chain. New initiatives to address security, social responsibility, and continuity risks in many regions will require close monitoring to assess their effectiveness at the ground-level.

    The data and analysis within this report is pulled directly from our global supply chain intelligence platform, SCREEN. SCREEN provides insight into global supply chain security, business continuity and corporate social responsibility threats and trends in real-time. SCREEN allows users to visualize risk on a global scale and easily identification high-risk locations and potential exposures. Our spotlight news feature and proprietary global risk maps help organizations stay up to date with emerging threats and better protect their supply chain, brand and reputation.

    Source: BSI

  • British International Freight Association names policy and compliance officer for customs issues

    Pawel Jarza

    This role will involve working with the trade, HMRC and other bodies to ensure customs processes and policies represent the best solutions for both trade and regulators particularly as new routines and solutions emerge during the negotiations and preparations for the UK to leave the European Union.

    Jarza started his career in the industry 12 years ago when he joined Yamato Transport Europe.  After that he moved to Arcadia and Landmark Global UK Ltd, gaining experience in a traditional forwarding environment, as well as specialising in e-commerce logistics.

    He has always specialised in the Customs environment and been involved in a number of Customs-related projects and assisting employers to obtain the appropriate authorisations.

    In his new position at BIFA, he will be working alongside Robert Windsor, executive director and Mike Jones, policy & compliance advisor (air matters) in BIFA's Policy & Compliance Department. He will become a member of BIFA's Customs Policy Group.

    BIFA Director General, Robert Keen said: “We welcome Pawel and are sure that his experience in the Customs environment will help our Policy & Compliance Department to fulfil its role of providing effective representation and support for BIFA members within the broader context of the UK and international freight services industry.”